Explosives

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Explosives have their own specific rules and mechanics, all of which are described here.


Types of explosions

Two major types of explosions are differentiated: Standard explosions and Localized explosions.

  • Standard explosions are the typical kind of explosions; big, loud, and deals a lot of damage. They cause two kinds of damage: Target damage and Splash damage. Most explosive weapons and ammo types cause Standard explosions, unless specifically described otherwise.
  • Localized explosions are produced only by certain items, most notably exploding ammunition types (namely, FRAG-12 and XPL), which are not quite as powerful as standard ones, but can generally be aimed at individual limbs like with any other ammunition type. Localized explosions are small, so they only cause Target damage (no splash damage at all), being closer in function to regular attacks.

Target damage

Target damage is simply the damage done to the intended target. This is where most of the damage an explosive weapon can deal is concentrated.

If a creature takes target damage from an explosion (in other words, they received a direct hit), it will deal the following:

  • Pain
  • Limb damage (which can, in turn, cause injuries)
  • Any additional effects such as shrapnel, fire, etc.

Splash damage

Standard explosions have the ability to deal Splash damage, through the blast and shockwave generated by the explosion.

Splash damage is dealt to all other creatures on the same Side as the intended target.

Statistically, Splash damage deals an amount of Pain identical to what Target damage would have dealt, but deals no limb damage. Additional effects such as shrapnel, fire, etc. may still apply.


Damage calculation

Explosives are special for dealing damage in a different manner than most other weapons and attacks.

Pain

All explosive weapons have a singular Pain value, rather than one for each Armor Class.

The singular Pain value applies across all ACs, effectively making Armor Class irrelevant towards protection against explosive damage. Since Pain is part of the damage that can be dealt through both Target and Splash damage, a single well-aimed attack with an explosive can wipe out groups of enemies on Pain alone.

Limb damage

If Pain is not enough, Limb damage of explosive weapons is calculated in a particular manner, depending on the weapon type, according to these following steps:

  • Calculate total limb damage value (1d8 + LDV) as normal, then check the result: this is referred to as Base Explosive Damage or BED.
  • The target will sustain limb damage on multiple body parts, at different rates depending on the body parts.

If the explosive weapon deals standard explosions, but is not a pressure mine:

  • All limbs in the UPPER BODY and LOWER BODY groups each receive 1x BED in limb damage
  • All limbs in the LIMB group each receive 0.5x (rounded) BED in limb damage
  • All limbs in the HEAD and EXTREMITY groups each receive 0.25x (rounded) BED in limb damage

If the explosive weapon is a pressure mine:

  • Any limbs that can be described as "legs", "feet" or equivalent each receive 1x BED in limb damage
  • All other limbs each receive 0.25x (rounded) BED in limb damage

If the explosive weapon deals localized explosions:

  • The limb that was struck by the projectile receives 1x BED in limb damage
  • All other limbs each receive 0.25x (rounded) BED in limb damage

All explosive weapons ignore the protective value of Armor Class entirely. For example, an A3 AC usually provides a LDV-3 effect, but an explosive weapon will ignore it.

Injuries

Injuries caused by an explosive weapon are wounds, however the amount and location of wounds caused by explosions is calculated differently from other weapons.

For every full 4 points of Base Explosive Damage rolled, 1 wound is sustained on a random body part. In other words, divide BED by 4 and round down to obtain the amount of wounds sustained.

  • Example: A target is hit by the explosion of a Type 86P mini-grenade, and BED is determined to be 11. 11 divided by 4 is 2.75. 2.75 is rounded down to 2, so the target sustained 2 wounds, each on a random body part.


Explosives versus Cover

Most cover will absorb target damage, but will not protect against splash damage. Creatures behind cover can therefore still be eliminated from the Pain damage or from shrapnel/fire of a standard explosion. Localized explosions do not cause splash damage, therefore they are sufficient to protect against those.

The only exception to this is if the cover in question has the blast-resistant trait; in which case, it will fully protect against both target and splash damage; effectively shielding all creatures in cover from explosive damage.

If an explosive weapon has the bouncing trait (VOG-25P grenades), then they have the ability to ignore cover entirely, acting as though there was no cover in the first place. There is no countermeasure for bouncing explosives!


Types of explosive weapons

Explosive weapons can be classified into the following groups:

  • Thrown / Fired
  • Planted explosives
    • Command detonation
    • Timed charges
    • Pressure mine
    • Directional mine

Thrown / Fired explosives

This is the most common type of explosive weapon. It covers hand grenades, grenade launcher and rocket launcher rounds, and explosive ammo types for firearms (FRAG-12 and XPL arrowheads).

They are subject to the same rules as any normal weapon; Accuracy, Skill requirements, and any applicable fire modes all apply as they normally would.

Attack roll results:

  • Success and critical success: The explosive hits the intended target.
  • Failure: The explosive misses the intended target, harming no-one, failing to explode or activate.
  • Critical failure: Depends on the weapon type.
    • Hand grenades (except Molotov cocktail): Explosive misses and fails to detonate - it becomes a dud. Dud explosives can be repaired with an Explosives Toolkit (1 use, grants 1 Skill Point in Repairing).
    • Molotov cocktail: Same as a regular failure.
    • GL ammunition, RL ammunition: Depends on weapon's failure type.

Using planted explosives

Planted explosives are intended to be laid down manually (Planting) but most of them can also be thrown into place.

Throwing

Throwing a planted explosive can be performed with all types except directional mines.

The explosive is treated more or less like a hand grenade. As with a hand grenade, a target must be designated to throw the explosive at.

Thrown weapons skill must be used to successfully throw a planted explosive - and can thus affect the accuracy of the throw.

  • Success: Explosive lands on the target's Side where intended and it will hurt targets if detonated.
    • Successfully killing a target with a planted explosive that has been thrown results in gaining Skill Points for the Thrown weapons skill instead of the Planted explosives skill.
  • Failure: Explosive still lands on the target's Side, but will deal no damage if detonated (bad angle, bad throw, etc.)

Unless you are throwing a timed explosive set to 0 turns, thrown planted explosives should not explode on the same turn it was thrown.

  • Command detonation explosives: You can use your detonator at any point starting on the next turn.
  • Timed explosives (timer set 1+ turn): Will explode on the turn the timer fell to 0.
  • Pressure mines: You must wait until the mines are primed (2 turns). Once the timer falls to 0, the mine will only explode if there are any creatures on the Side it was thrown into.

Planting

Planting is, as their name might suggest, the intended way to use a planted explosive. The procedure is very different from using most other weapons, and is detailed in this section.

The term planting refers to the procedure of priming the explosive then placing it either near, or on the target. The planting process is considered to be a combat action, and calls for Planted explosives skill.

Roll results:

  • Success and critical success: The explosive is properly deployed and planted. Kills result in gaining Planted explosives Skill Points.
  • Failure: The explosive is not properly deployed, the Contestant must try again and spend another turn to attempt deploying it.
  • Critical failure: The tripwire, fuze, or signal receiver device is broken, rendering the explosive a dud. Duds can never explode, and can be repaired with an Explosives Toolkit (1 use).

Like with other explosive weapons, a target can be designated. The explosive will then be placed on the floor, near the designated target.

  • If planting is done during combat, especially if the intended target is on a different Side, then in a manner similar to melee weapons, this is treated as combat movement; the user will move into the target's Side to attempt planting the explosive.

Once an explosive has been properly planted, the user's turn ends. If the user has moved into another Side in the process, they will remain there (again, like with melee weapons) and will only be able to move or perform another action on their next turn, so exercise proper caution. What happens afterwards depends on the type (sometimes, specific model) of planted explosive used; see the section below for more details.

Types of planted explosives

There are four types of planted explosives: Command detonation, Timed charges, Pressure mines, and Directional mines.

Certain explosives (e.g. SLAM) may be referred to as multipurpose; meaning that they have multiple modes that the user can set it to, each mode corresponding to one of the types listed below, thus allowing the weapon to be used in different ways.

Command detonation explosives

A command detonation explosive (e.g. Mini C4 charge) is an explosive that will only detonate on command, i.e. by using a detonator.

When placing command detonation charges, they are "paired" with the user's detonator; only that detonator can detonate these explosives.

Timed charges

A timed charge is an explosive that detonates when its internal timer falls down to zero turns.

The timer can be set to anywhere between 0 and 9 turns.

If set to 0 turns, the timed charge will explode in the same turn the timer was set.

  • Do not plant a timed charge with the timer set to 0; it will immediately explode at you, and you will take Target Damage (everyone else on your Side will take Splash Damage). The 0-turn timer is intended to allow you to throw it, as an impromptu hand grenade.

If set to anywhere between 1 and 9 turns, a timed charge can be planted safely on your current Side, so long as you take the same safety precautions as with a pressure mine. It will explode on the turn the counter reaches 0, as a non-combat action.

  • It is unsafe to set the timer to 1 turn before planting it. If you intend to leave the Side where a 1-turn timedcharge was planted, you will be forced to "race" your own SLAM's timer, as non-combat movement to another Side has the same Initiative Speed as the explosive, and any slower action will guarantee it will explode before you can leave.

If multiple timed charges have been planted on the same Side, one explosion (including that of a charge) will set off all of them at the same time, effectively increasing the amount of damage that can be potentially dealt.

Pressure mines

A pressure mine (e.g. TS-50) is an explosive that detonates when it is primed and when a creature steps on its trigger, tripping the explosive charge it contains.

In game terms, pressure mines provide area denial of one Side. Pressure mines are primed 2 turns after they are planted, leaving enough time for the planter to leave the mined Side without tripping the mines themselves.

Once primed, a pressure mine will automatically detonate if there is any creature on the Side it is planted (treated as a non-combat action), and will deal Target damage to all creatures on that side. Pressure mines can also be deployed by throwing, but missing will result in the Mine falling in the intended Side, but never priming, allowing potential enemies to steal or dispose of it.

Primed pressure mines will also detonate if an explosion (Standard or Localized) of any kind is set off on the mined Side. If multiple pressure mines have been planted on the same Side, one explosion (including that of a mine) will set off all of them at the same time, effectively increasing the amount of damage that can be potentially dealt. This can be exploited as a disposal method as well.

  • NOTE: Certain pressure mines (such as the SLAM in Mode 3) have a manual timer, allowing the user to set the amount of turns it takes until priming (instead of it being fixed to 2 turns). This can be used to potentially plant a large amount of mines on the same Side safely and effectively, without having to resort to throwing them.

Directional mines

A directional mine (e.g. M18A1 Claymore) is an explosive that protects against threats coming from a specific direction. Typically, these mines do not actually create an explosion, but instead fire a payload of projectiles, like a sort of fixed gun.

A directional mine is intended to be planted on a Side the user wishes to protect (Protected Side), and pointed at another Side of the battlespace ; the direction from which a threat is expected (Target Side). Once setup, a directional mine is instantly primed. Directional mines detonate when any creature approaches from the Target Side and attempts moving into the Protected Side; at which point the creature takes damage from the mine, and their turn ends prematurely (cancelling any attack they were about to perform, if any).

  • NOTE: Certain directional mines (such as the SLAM in Mode 4) actually do cause an explosion upon detonating; they are always Localized explosions, to avoid hurting or killing creatures on the Protected Side.

Directional mines cannot be thrown, they can only be planted.

Explosive ordnance disposal

"EOD" redirects here. If you're looking for the EOD suit or EOD helmet, see List of human clothing and armor.

On occasion, you may face the need to remove or dispose of already planted explosives.

Normally, the GM should inform the player of any primed explosives in the current room, their exact location, and for directional mines, the direction (the Target Side) they're aimed at.

The disposal procedure depends on the type:

  • Command detonation: A primed command detonated charge can be defused by going on the Side it is planted, then perform a defusing action on it. Defusing is a non-combat action, and 2 defusing actions must be completed in order to successfully defuse the charge, during which the explosive can still be detonated if someone else is in control of the paired detonator. Successfully de-priming a command detonated charge turns it into a weapon that is safe to pick up and re-use.
  • Timed charges: A primed timed charge can be defused by going on the Side it is planted, then perform a defusing action on it. Defusing is a non-combat action, and 2 defusing actions must be completed in order to successfully defuse the charge. If there is only 1 turn remaining on the timer, and only 1 remaining disabling action to perform, there is a 50% chance of successful defusal, and a 50% chance of detonation (as both are treated as non-combat actions, both have the same Initiative Speed of 0).
  • Pressure mines: Pressure mines detonate when they detect any creature on the Side they're planted into. They cannot be defused, as there is no way to safely approach one. The only way to safely dispose of a primed pressure mine is to set off another explosion on the mined Side; pressure mines will detonate when another explosion (Standard or Localized) occur on their Side, including from other mines detonating (so there is no need to set off more than one to dispose of multiple). The attack roll must be successful in order for the explosion to set a primed pressure mine off; otherwise the primed mine will remain unscathed.
  • Directional mines: Directional mines detonate when they detect any creature coming from the Target Side (the direction they're pointing at) going towards the Protected Side (the position they're defending). In order to defuse a directional mine, simply come into the Protected Side from another Side than the Target, then perform a defusing action on it. Defusing is a non-combat action, and 2 defusing actions must be completed in order to successfully defuse the mine. Successfully defusing a directional mine turns it into a weapon that is safe to pick up and re-use.

If you have an Explosives Toolkit (XTK), you can spend one use to complete 2 defusing actions in a single turn, allowing for single-turn disposal of a primed command detonation explosive, timed charge, or directional mine.

Successful defusal of any explosive, whether or not an XTK was used, grants 2 Skill Points in Repairing.


Additional effects

Certain explosive weapons do more than simply producing a harmful explosion, with various terms to describe each effect:

  • High Explosive (HE) refers to weapons that produce an explosion and nothing else.
  • Fragmentation (Frag) refers to weapons that produce a number of shrapnel as an additional effect of splash damage.
  • HE/Incendiary (HE-I) refers to weapons that produce both an explosion and an incendiary effect, as an additional effect of splash damage.
  • Incendiary (I) refers to weapons that only produce an incendiary effect and do not technically explode.
  • Flashbang refers to weapons that produce a flashbang effect, the explosion being intended to disorient through temporary blinding and deafening, rather than cause direct damage.
  • Gas cloud refers to weapons that produce a cloud of gas of some kind and do not technically explode.

Fragmentation

Fragmentation weapons produce a certain quantity of shrapnel when exploding; the exact quantity depends on the weapon.

Shrapnel are part of the splash damage effects, and all targets hit by a fragmenting weapon will be hit by shrapnel as well. Each weapon has a listed amount of shrapnel (usually in dice notation) that can be sent; this quantity must be rolled for each target. All shrapnel will land on a random body part.

Shrapnel damage is not affected by the damage modifier from an inaccurate hit.

Shrapnel damage tables

Damage type Quantity LDV Pain (C1) Pain (C2) Pain (A1) Pain (A2) Pain (A3) Pain (A4) Pain (A5)
Bullet (Varies by weapon) -1 25% 23% 20% 16% 13% 6% 2%

Incendiary

HE/Incendiary and Incendiary explosives have the ability to set targets on fire.

The incendiary effect is part of splash damage; therefore all targets hit by an incendiary weapon are at risk of being set on fire. A random body part must be selected; unless that body part is protected by fire-retardant clothing or that creature is entirely immune to fire, then that creature will be set on fire.

Flashbang

Though not explosives in the conventional sense, flashbang weapons and ammunition are designed to induce the flashbang effect.

All creatures affected by a flashbang will gain the Blindness effect for 2 turns. If any creature affected by a flashbang was also under the effects of Night vision, such as that provided by Night vision goggles, the length of that effect is doubled (4 turns, instead of 2).

Dice results:

  • A critical success will double the length of the blindness effect (4 turns, instead of 2). If it was aimed at any particular creature, the GM may, at their discretion, deal a small amount of damage to that creature; a flashbang grenade landing on someone's head or exploding in someone's face is rarely pleasant.
    • The effects of Night vision and a critical success stack; meaning such a creature will be blinded for 8 turns (2 x2 x2).
  • A regular success will result in the normal effects of a flashbang occurring.
  • A failure results in the flashbang failing to disorient anyone, imparting its effects to no creatures.
  • A critical failure results in throwing a dud grenade, with no effects.

Gas clouds

Though not explosives per se, certain weapons are capable of dispersing gas clouds, which may produce a variety of harmful effects. There are three types of gas clouds: Smoke clouds, Tear gas clouds, and Chlorine gas clouds.

Smoke clouds

Smoke clouds are designed to obfuscate and reduce visibility, hindering accuracy. They are completely harmless but may be useful in the right circumstances.

It is not necessary to aim weapons producing these clouds at any particular creature (specifying a Side is enough), as the cloud will affect every creature on the same Side.

Dice results:

  • A critical success will double the length of the smoke cloud's life (6 turns instead of 3 turns). If it was aimed at any particular creature, the GM may, at their discretion, deal a small amount of damage to that creature; a smoke grenade landing on someone's head or exploding in someone's face is rarely pleasant.
  • A regular success will result in the normal effects of the smoke cloud occurring.
  • A failure still results in a smoke cloud occurring, but for only 1 turn instead of the normal amount.
  • A critical failure results in throwing a dud grenade, with no effects.

Smoke clouds have the following properties:

  • Engulfs an entire Side of the battlespace, affecting every creature inside.
  • Lasts for 3 turns, at the end of which the cloud dissipates, and the effects listed below cease.
  • All creatures inside the cloud suffer from a FT+2 malus. This hazard cannot be mitigated by the Immunity to gases effect, such as one given by a gas mask; as the purpose of smoke is obfuscation, not damage.
  • All creatures outside the cloud suffer from a IR+2 malus, if aiming at creatures inside the cloud.

Tear gas clouds

Tear gas clouds are designed to disorient and induce tearing and coughing, hindering accuracy and causing minor amounts of Pain. Their purpose is soft area denial and dispersion.

It is not necessary to aim weapons producing these clouds at any particular creature (specifying a Side is enough), as the cloud will affect every creature on the same Side.

Dice results:

  • A critical success will double the length of the tear gas cloud's life (6 turns instead of 3 turns). If it was aimed at any particular creature, the GM may, at their discretion, deal a small amount of damage to that creature; a tear gas grenade landing on someone's head or exploding in someone's face is rarely pleasant.
  • A regular success will result in the normal effects of the tear gas cloud occurring.
  • A failure still results in a tear gas cloud occurring, but for only 1 turn instead of the normal amount.
  • A critical failure results in throwing a dud grenade, with no effects.

Tear gas clouds have the following properties:

  • Engulfs an entire Side of the battlespace, affecting every creature inside.
  • Lasts for 3 turns, at the end of which the cloud dissipates, and the effects listed below cease.
  • All creatures inside the cloud suffer from a FT+1 malus, and sustain damage at a rate of +7% Pain per turn, regardless of Pain Sensitivity. This hazard can be completely canceled by the Immunity to gases effect, such as one given by a gas mask.

Chlorine gas clouds

Chlorine gas clouds are designed to hurt and maim through poisoning. They are disorienting and highly damaging, inducing pain and limb damage every turn, making them extremely dangerous.

It is not necessary to aim weapons producing these clouds at any particular creature (specifying a Side is enough), as the cloud will affect every creature on the same Side.

Dice results:

  • A critical success will double the length of the chlorine gas cloud's life (6 turns instead of 3 turns). If it was aimed at any particular creature, the GM may, at their discretion, deal a small amount of damage to that creature; a chlorine gas grenade landing on someone's head or exploding in someone's face is rarely pleasant.
  • A regular success will result in the normal effects of the chlorine gas cloud occurring.
  • A failure still results in a chlorine gas cloud occurring, but for only 1 turn instead of the normal amount.
  • A critical failure results in throwing a dud grenade, with no effects.

Chlorine gas clouds have the following properties:

  • Engulfs an entire Side of the battlespace, affecting every creature inside.
  • Lasts for 4 turns, at the end of which the cloud dissipates, and the effects listed below cease.
  • All creatures inside the cloud suffer from a FT+2 malus, and sustain damage at a rate of +9% Pain per turn, regardless of Pain Sensitivity, and 2 limb damage to a random body part'. This hazard can be completely canceled by the Immunity to gases effect, such as one given by a gas mask.